nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

In today’s interview with Seth Meyers Terry asked him about his transition from Saturday Night Live, where he spent 12 years, to hosting Late Night. Seth described how it feels to move on:  

"I do [miss it]. I miss it a little bit less every day, which is nice. The thing I was so worried about leaving SNL was just the family and the routine and all of the wonderful people that I got to spend so much time with. And obviously as you build a new show like we have, you find there are other really lovely people that you get to sort of build a new family with. I do miss the rush of SNL and on Saturday at 11:30 when I’m sitting at home I feel phantom limbs, if that’s the right expression, of just wanting to be out there.”

Photo by Peter Kramer/NBC

nprfreshair:

In today’s interview with Seth Meyers Terry asked him about his transition from Saturday Night Live, where he spent 12 years, to hosting Late Night. Seth described how it feels to move on:  

"I do [miss it]. I miss it a little bit less every day, which is nice. The thing I was so worried about leaving SNL was just the family and the routine and all of the wonderful people that I got to spend so much time with. And obviously as you build a new show like we have, you find there are other really lovely people that you get to sort of build a new family with. I do miss the rush of SNL and on Saturday at 11:30 when I’m sitting at home I feel phantom limbs, if that’s the right expression, of just wanting to be out there.”

Photo by Peter Kramer/NBC

jamiatt

With a fifty-dollar-a-month rent-regulated East Village apartment, I could write one lucrative article for a mainstream magazine and support myself for weeks or even months while I did what I liked, whether that meant writing for countercultural publications that couldn’t pay or going to political meetings. When I did have jobs, I didn’t worry overmuch about losing them, and so felt no impulse, let alone need, to kiss anyone’s ass. There was always another job, or another assignment. At one point, while I was living with a group of people in Colorado, the money I made writing (sporadically) about rock for the New Yorker was supporting my entire household.

Since the early ’70s, however, the symbiosis has been working in reverse: a steady decline in Americans’ standard of living has fed political and cultural conservatism, and vice versa. Just as the widespread affluence of the post–World War II era was the product of deliberate social policy—an alliance of business, labor, and government aimed at stabilizing the economy and building a solid, patriotic middle class as a bulwark against Soviet Communism and domestic radicalism—the waning of affluence has reflected the resolve of capital to break away from this constraining alliance.

Scratch magazine excerpted one of the most frighteningly relevant essays in “The Essential Ellen Willis.” So happy it will be online forevermore! (via theothernwa)

How much time writers used to have to work on pieces has become a sort of obsession for me. I keep fantasizing about having a month to work on something — maybe only a 2000- or 3000-word thing. As an experiment (necessarily on my own time, fit into little holes between the very long days I tend to work), I’d love to write even one piece this way, committing myself to taking 160 or more hours on it, just to see how it would come out.

(via judyxberman)

Most writers I know could give a shit about ever owning their own home or taking a fancy vacation somewhere. All they want is the time to do their own work. Time is our modern luxury.

(via jamiatt)