books
rookiemag:

There is a really wonderful profile on Rookie contrib Roxane Gay in the Guardian. Roxane’s book, Bad Feminist, was published yesterday. I’m only halfway through right now, but I can already tell it’s one of the best books I’ve read in a long time. I urge you all to pick up a copy, or request it from the library, or ask that your library carry it. And, of course, if you can’t get your hands on it just yet, there is always Roxane’s prolific Tumblr, which you should follow.
xx.
Anna Fitz

rookiemag:

There is a really wonderful profile on Rookie contrib Roxane Gay in the Guardian. Roxane’s book, Bad Feminist, was published yesterday. I’m only halfway through right now, but I can already tell it’s one of the best books I’ve read in a long time. I urge you all to pick up a copy, or request it from the library, or ask that your library carry it. And, of course, if you can’t get your hands on it just yet, there is always Roxane’s prolific Tumblr, which you should follow.

xx.

Anna Fitz

bbook
bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.
Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.
A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames

bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.

Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.

A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames